Quotes in defense of the Expanded Universe

"It was never canon"

“Gospel or Canon, as we refer to it, includes the screenplays, the films, the radio dramas and the novelizations. These works spin out of George Lucas' original stories, the rest are created by other writers. However between us, we've read everything and much of it is taken into account in the overall continuity." - Sue Rostoni, Lucas Books and Lucas Licensing Managing Editor and Allan Kausch Continuity Editor for Lucasfilm, Star Wars Insider 23 Fall of 1994

“Everyone in the content-creating galaxy of Star Wars has a copy of “The Bible,” a burgeoning canonical document (currently a hundred and seventy pages long) that is maintained by “continuity editors” Allan Kausch and Sue Rostoni. It is a chronology of all the events that have ever occurred in the Star Wars universe, in all the films, books, CD-roms, Nintendo games, comic books, and role-playing guides, and each medium is seamlessly coordinated with the others.””-Tom Dupree, editor for Bantam Spectra Star Wars books article from the New Yorker, Why the force is still with us, January 6, 1997

"Continuity has been the supreme commandment at Lucasfilm for Shadows and all its Star Wars projects. The company had made the decision to not only expand its universe but have it unfold as a seamless chronicle. Whether a new star system is explored in a novel or a scene is set in ancient Jedi days from a comic series, nothing can contradict the history or logic of what has gone before.


To keep it all straight there is 'The Canon', a timeline of major events and lifespan of main characters prepared by the continuity editors of Lucasfilm and considered the in-house bible of the Star Wars universe." - Mark Cotta Vaz, The Secrets of Shadows of the Empire, 1996

"Everything that (is approved) by Lucasfilm is official.  No matter how small the contribution,  we've added to the well,"- Peter Schweighofer‏, author for the EU, Star Wars Galaxy Collector magazine #1 by Topps, 1998

“According to Lucas Licensing Editor Sue, Rostoni, ‘Canon refers to an authoritative list of books that Lucas Licensing editors consider an authentic part of the official Star Wars history. Our goal is to present a continuous and unified history of the Star Wars galaxy, insofar as that history does not conflict with, or undermine the meaning of Mr. Lucas’s Star Wars saga of films and screenplays.’ Things that Lucas Licensing does not consider official parts of the continuous Star Wars history show an Infinities logo or are contained in Star Wars Tales. Everything else is considered canon.”-Sue Rostoni, Lucas Books and Lucas Licensing Managing Editor, in Star Wars gamer #6, July 1, 2001

“Basically, everything except those items marked with an “Infinity” logo (i.e. the Star Wars Tales comics) is considered canon.”-Sue Rostoni, Lucas Books and Lucas Licensing Managing Editor, Starwars.com May 30, 2003

“”Lucasfilm canon” refers to anything produced by any of the Lucas companies, whether it be movies, books games or internet. “Movie canon” is only what you see and hear in the Star Wars films”- Leland Chee, Continuity Database administrator aka Keeper of the Holocron for Lucas Licensing, Starwars.com May 30, 2003

Continuity vs canon) “Its pretty much the same-sounds better to say that we try to maintain the continuity of the universe, rather than saying the canon of the universe”- Sue Rostoni, Lucas Books and Lucas Licensing Managing Editor, on Starwars.com September 2003

“When asked if the G and C-levels formed separate and independent canon, Chee responded by stating that both were part of a single canon: “There is one overall continuity.”"-Leland Chee, Continuity Database administrator aka Keeper of the Holocron for Lucas Licensing, on Starwars.com August 4, 2004

“The concept of an expanded universe certainly isn’t unique to star wars. Many popular genre properties from Star Trek to Alien, release spin off tales that shed light on events not seen in the official narrative. But Star Wars EU is unique both in its size and its care which is in the narrative which is shepherd and organized and Star Wars the Expanded universe is official.” –Daniel Wallace, Author for the Expanded Universe, Star wars insider 101 May 2008

"It was a mess of contradictions"

“Lucasfilm and Bantam decided that future novels in the series would be interconnected: that is, events in one novel would have consequences in the others. You might say that each Bantam Star Wars novel, enjoyable on its own, is also a part of a larger tale.”- Statement in the original prints of the Bantam Star Wars books 1990s

“A great deal of attention and care has been put into fleshing out the star wars universe because fans are sophisticated and demand a cohesive approach. Star Wars universe is unique in each story builds upon the last and leads into the next.”- Sue Rostoni, Lucas Books and Lucas Licensing Managing Editor and Allan Kausch Continuity Editor for Lucasfilm, Star Wars Insider 23 Fall of 1994

“Unlike Star Trek, which is a series of episodes connected by no central narrative, Star Wars is a single story--"a finite, expanding universe," in the words of Tom Dupree, who edits Bantam’s Star Wars novels in New York. Everyone in the content-creating galaxy of Star Wars has a copy of “The Bible,” a burgeoning canonical document (currently a hundred and seventy pages long) that is maintained by “continuity editors” Allan Kausch and Sue Rostoni. It is a chronology of all the events that have ever occurred in the Star Wars universe, in all the films, books, CD-roms, Nintendo games, comic books, and role-playing guides, and each medium is seamlessly coordinated with the others.””-Tom Dupree, editor for Bantam Spectra Star Wars books article from the New Yorker, Why the force is still with us, January 6, 1997

"We have a tremendous amount of reference material including the original screen plays, the films, the West End Games books, the Guide to the Star Wars Universe and our in house timeline which includes, titles and synopses of all published material. As new works are published we update an in house extension of the guide, adding new characters, terms and events. We also have access to the memory banks of other Star Wars professionals for those rare occasions when we are stumped.” - Sue Rostoni, Lucas Books and Lucas Licensing Managing Editor and Allan Kausch Continuity Editor for Lucasfilm, Star Wars Insider 23 Fall of 1994

"Other writers besides myself and Timothy Zahn are writing further adventures in the Star Wars universe, all of which will begin regularly appearing in your bookstore [. . .] Each installment changes the characters and the galactic situation in the overall saga. The Star Wars universe is complex and vast, and internally consistent--and we authors have to keep it that way. [. . .] The details established in the films are clear-cut and obvious to follow. A bigger problem comes when we authors need to be consistent with each other. Since we are writing most of these novels concurrently, we have to be fully aware of the other developing stories even though our novels are set in different time frames. Lucy Wilson at Lucasfilm has been our primary contact and conduit for information, offering her own suggestions and helping keep the stories unified. She has told us that we don't necessarily have to refer to everything that happens in the other writers' adventures, but we must make certain that we just don't contradict anything."-Kevin J. Anderson, EU author, introduction to the "Dark Empire" collection 1995

“New developments in even the remotest corners of the Star Wars universe are always approved by Lucas himself. The continuity editors send him checklists of potential events, and Lucas checks yes or no. "When Bantam wanted to do the back story on Yoda," Dupree said, "George said that was off limits, because he wanted him to remain a mysterious character. But George has made available some time between the start of Episode Four, when Han Solo is a young pilot on the planet Corellia, and the end of the prequel, so we're working with that now."”-John Seabrook, Writer for the New Yorker, article from the New Yorker, Why the force is still with us, January 6, 1997

"’We set parameters,’ Roffman says. “It had to be an important extension of the continuity, and it had to have an internal integrity with the events portrayed in the films.” Closely tending the canon was paying off with fans. Essentially, all the new comic books, novels, and games were prequels and sequels of one another”-Howard Roffman, President of Lucas Licensing, Interview with thewire.com, Meet Leland Chee, the Star Wars Franchise Continuity Cop, August 2008

One of the biggest strengths of the Star Wars expanded universe – and something that sets it apart from similar franchises – is the fact that in its 30+ years of existence there’s never been a need for a reboot. Continuity has never become so out-of-whack that writers have been forced to throw in the towel and start over” – unaccredited editor’s notes on the Starwars.com article, Introducing… Leland Chee, July 19, 2012

“LucasBooks has always checked with the boss to make sure that none of its projects interferes in any way with anything that he is planning. And while plans can change, rest assured that the wonderful expanded fictional universe enjoyed by so many fans has in no way stomped or trampled on any of George Lucas's prerogatives or options."-Steve Sansweet, Director of content management and had of fan relations at Lucasfilm, Starwars.com November, 2000

"The thing about Star Wars is that there's one universe," Chee says. "Everyone wants to know stuff, like, where did Mace Windu get that purple lightsaber? We want to establish that there's one and only one answer."-Leland Chee, Continuity Database administrator aka Keeper of the Holocron for Lucas Licensing, Interview with thewire.com, Meet Leland Chee, the Star Wars Franchise Continuity Cop August 2008

"[HolocronKeeper] does not support the notion of parallel SW universes."-Leland Chee, Continuity Database administrator aka Keeper of the Holocron for Lucas Licensing, Tweet August 2009

“In the end, my ongoing vision is that as long as there’s the Holocron, Star Wars will not reboot.”-Leland Chee, Continuity Database administrator aka Keeper of the Holocron for Lucas Licensing, Starwars.com article, What is the Holocron, July 20, 2012

“For Star Wars, we decided that this was a history. Each novel would take place in a certain timeframe, what happened in previous books would have an effect on the current one.-Kevin J. Anderson, EU author, Interview: Star Wars Author Kevin J. Anderson On Jedi Academy Trilogy, Darksaber, & Tales of the Jedi, November 18, 2014

At the time, we were all a team of authors. I was in contact with Dave Wolverton, Kathy Tyers, Mike Stackpole, and Tim Zahn, along with Tom Veitch a great deal with Tales of the Jedi comics. We were like a small team exchanging ideas. Tim Zahn would plant something in The Last Command that I picked up on in Jedi Search, and we did that sort of stuff. I’ve been out of the loop for a while, I’m not sure if LucasFilm writers do the same thing now, but we had a great little team who were building the history of this universe. We were like the worker bees building a foundation. -Kevin J. Anderson, EU author, Interview: Star Wars Author Kevin J. Anderson On Jedi Academy Trilogy, Darksaber, & Tales of the Jedi, November 18, 2014

"George didn’t care/he never considered it star wars/parallel universe arguments"

“After Star Wars was released, it became apparent that my story—however many films it took to tell—was only one of thousands that could be told about the characters who inhabit its galaxy. But these were not stories I was destined to tell. Instead they would spring from the imagination of other writers, inspired by the glimpse of a galaxy that Star Wars provided. Today it is an amazing, if unexpected, legacy of Star Wars that so many gifted writers are contributing new stories to the Saga.”-George Lucas introduction to the 1994 reprint of splinter of the Mind’s Eye

“Lucas’s day-to-day activities in the main house include the management of the Star Wars story, which is probably the most carefully tended secular story on Earth. Unlike Star Trek, which is a series of episodes connected by no central narrative, Star Wars is a single story–“a finite, expanding universe,” in the words of Tom Dupree, who edits Bantam’s Star Wars novels in New York. Everyone in the content-creating galaxy of Star Wars has a copy of “The Bible,” a burgeoning canonical document (currently a hundred and seventy pages long) that is maintained by “continuity editors” Allan Kausch and Sue Rostoni. It is a chronology of all the events that have ever occurred in the Star Wars universe, in all the films, books, CD-roms, Nintendo games, comic books, and role-playing guides, and each medium is seamlessly coordinated with the others.” - John Seabrook, Writer for the New Yorker, article from the New Yorker, Why the force is still with us, January 6, 1997

“He knows the comics very well – after the fact. He reads the comics. George knows more about Star Wars than we do. He doesn’t see the expanded universe as ‘his’ Star Wars but as ‘ours’. I think this has been mentioned previously, maybe in other places, but it’s not new info, as far as I remember”-Sue Rostoni, Lucas Books and Lucas Licensing Managing Editor, Starwars.com June 2004

"GL is certainly not bound by the EU, though he's certainly open to using things created in it (Aayla Secura and the Coruscant name, for example). On the other hand, the quote you provide makes it sound like the EU is separate from George's vision of the Star Wars universe. It is not. The EU must follow certain tenets set by George through the films and other guidelines that he provides outside of the films."-Leland Chee, Continuity Database administrator aka Keeper of the Holocron for Lucas Licensing, on starwars.com December 7, 2005 (In response to the “I don’t read those books” Starlog magazine quote)

“Everything outside of the films was collectively known as the Expanded Universe serving as an extension of the same universe as the films.  If something happened in a book or a comic, it could potentially affect everything else happening in the universe.  Any discrepancies that resulted would be resolved or retconned (short for retroactive continuity, i.e. changes from previously established continuity) across the board to try and create some consistency.”-Leland Chee, Continuity Database administrator aka Keeper of the Holocron for Lucas Licensing, Starwars.com July 20, 2012

(In a response to the criticism of the Sith and dark Jedi in the Tales of the Jedi) “The background came directly to us from George Lucas we’re following his guidelines and building a story within the parameters he himself laid down. It may not match with your own ideas- but this is George’s universe and he gets to establish the rules. We just try to tell the best story we can within them.” 

Kevin J. Anderson author for the expanded Universe, Tales of the Jedi fall of the Sith Empire 1 in the letter to the editor column June 1997.

“As far as I know he hasn’t read any of my novels. From what I’ve heard Lucas is a visual man, he likes the comic books for the visual aspect. Frankly I don’t think that he has time to read so I am not offended.”-Timothy Zahn, Author for the EU, The book report interview November, 1997

“In Vector Prime, based on a story line approved by George Lucas. New York Times bestselling author R. A. Salvatore take the Star Wars universe to previously unscaled heights of action and imagination, expanding the beloved story of a galaxy far, far away…” Preface found in the front cover of the novel Vector Prime by R. A. Salvatore, 1999

“In general, George doesn’t see the overall story ideas or concepts. If there is a sensitive area, or if we are developing backstory for a character he’s created or mentioned in an interview, we can query him to get more information, his approval, or whatever. And yes, we always query him if we’re doing something drastic to a film character. I believe he does read the concepts for the games though”-Sue Rostoni, Lucas Books and Lucas Licensing Managing Editor, Starwars.com June 2004

"”Parallel universe” suggests that each universe can go in separate directions which really isn't the case with regard to the EU. The EU is bound by what is seen in the most current version of the films and by directives from George Lucas."-Leland Chee, Continuity Database administrator aka Keeper of the Holocron for Lucas Licensing, Starwars.com January, 2005

“George Lucas says “There really isn’t any story to tell. It’s been covered in the books, and video games, and comic books which are things I think are incredibly creative.”” George Lucas Interview with the LA times, George Lucas: 'Star Wars' won't go beyond Darth Vader, May 7th, 2008

“Lucas approves every important addition to the canon. The ambitious story beats contained in the new game The Force Unleashed were permitted only after he signed off—and spent hours talking to the developers about the relationship between Darth Vader and the Emperor.”- Leland Chee, Continuity Database administrator aka Keeper of the Holocron for Lucas Licensing, Interview with thewire.com, Meet Leland Chee, the Star Wars Franchise Continuity Cop, August 18th, 2008

"George Always planned on having episode VII-IX"

At one point early on, George Lucas talked of possibly needing nine movies to tell his tale of the Skywalker family. But as he actually worked through the story line, he realized long ago that the story he wanted to tell could naturally be told in six two-hour films. The nine-episode mantra, however, refuses to die...and we realize, never will. But George says that the story he has to tell will be complete in the six films, which can then be viewed as one epic saga. He says that he honestly has no story to tell now beyond the destruction of the second Death Star.” Steve Sansweet, Director of content management and had of fan relations at Lucasfilm,  Starwars.com November, 2000 

“Each time I do a trilogy it's 10 years out of my life.  I'll finish “Episode III” and I'll be 60.  And the next 20 years after that I want to spend doing something other than “Star Wars.”  If at 80 I'm still lively and having a good time and think I can work hard for another 10 years between 80 and 90, I might consider it.  But don't count on it.  There's nothing written, and it's not like I'm completing something.  I'd have to start from scratch.  [The idea of episodes VII, VIII, and IX] was more of a media thing than it was me.”-George Lucas TV guide interview, Matters of life and Darth, November 2001

"He also reiterated that there would be no third trilogy, despite what he said years ago about the whole story being a trilogy of trilogies. He said it was a joke, and The Rolling Stone printed the idea as fact. After Episode III, there will be only printed Star Wars stories from now on.”-George Lucas as reported by Cinescape magazine July 2002

When asked if he would ever make the third trilogy “I'm not going to do it. I'm too old. I've got other movies I want to do. And I don't want anybody else to do it, so I've locked it up so nobody can ever do it. There may be TV offshoots from people, but the saga itself, the story of the Skywalker family, is over."-George Lucas Entertainment Weekly #785 interview September 24, 2004

"I've left pretty explicit instructions for there not to be any more features. There will definitely be no Episodes VII-IX. That's because there isn't any story. I mean, I never thought of anything. And now there have been novels about the events after Episode VI”-George Lucas Total film magazine interview May 2008

I get asked all the time, 'What happens after "Return of the Jedi"?, and there really is no answer for that," he said. "The movies were the story of Anakin Skywalker and Luke Skywalker, and when Luke saves the galaxy and redeems his father, that's where that story ends." George Lucas Los Angeles Times Interview, George Lucas: 'Star Wars' won't go beyond Darth Vader, May 7th, 2008

"George’s word is law and he never goes back on what he says"

“People who alter or destroy works of art and our cultural heritage for profit or as an exercise of power are barbarians”-George Lucas Speech to congress March 3, 1988

"The Authors are supportive of the reboot"

“A reboot would be really, really messy. There are currently 140 odd adult novels alone not counting childrens, young adults, art books, schematics all that 140 adult novels. To just say ok we are going to wipe those out, especially since many of them are still on the books shelves or book store shelves. What are you going to do, are you going to say all of these, we are just going to stop selling them? Del Rey would not like that, Bantam would not like that. The publishing industry has taken enough of a hit these days as it is. A reboot would be immensely hard to do.”-Timothy Zahn, Author for the EU, Star Wars fan days IV October 10, 2011

“The thing about reboots is that the two arenas that reboots are successful, one is comic books universes and one is TV series.  Comic books universes work largely because comic books sales are generational I mean most people read comics for a span of years from their childhood to say when they get to college. People who come to an event like this, to Star Wars fan days, are exceptions you have to remember that you are not the kind of people I am talking about. But the large audience are in fact people who read until they are college age and then stop. So a generational reboot works and a TV series reboot works because 10, 15, 20 years after the series is dead you have a new generation of viewers. Battlestar Galactica worked that way, the original series aired in 1978 and by the time the new series was done that generation was in its 40s and had fond memories that were pretty vague. But the Star Wars universe is being actively maintained by leadership and a fan base that is vitally interested in what’s going on so it would be an immense pressure not to reboot.”-Aaron Allston, Author for the EU, Star Wars fan days IV October 10, 2011

"Lucasfilm is the one calling the Shots not Disney"

“Still, Iger wanted to make sure that Lucas, who was used to controlling every aspect of Star Wars, from set design to lunchboxes, understood that Disney, not Lucasfilm, would have final say over any future movies.”-Dave Leonard, Businessweek.com editor, in Businessweek.com article, How Disney Bought Lucasfilm—and Its Plans for 'Star Wars,  March 7, 2013

“We needed to have an understanding that if we acquire the company, despite tons of collegial conversations and collaboration, at the end of the day, we have to be the ones who sign off on whatever the plans are,”-Alan Horn, Chairman of Walt Disney studios, Businessweek.com article, How Disney Bought Lucasfilm—and Its Plans for 'Star Wars, March 7, 2013

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